• Resources

    30+ free resources for finding historical California maps

    Maps are a great way to see not only the history of your house, but of your neighborhood, city, and county! You can use maps to see physical changes to your house and land, see how highways and roads developed, locations of businesses long closed, and lots more. They’re a great way to understand the context of your house over the years. Maps are a necessary component to any house history research, but actually finding historical maps can be a little tricky. Luckily, archives and historical societies have taken the time to digitize hundreds of historical maps and make them available online– you just have to know where to look.…

  • Webinars

    Webinar: Ten Databases You Need to Know About (Legacy Family Tree)

    Title: “Ten Databases You Need to Know About ” Presenter: Shannon Combs-Bennett, T2 Family History Date viewed: December 30, 2020 (1h20m) Permalink: https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=1216 Summary: Researchers depend on the internet but often look at only a few sites. These 10 databases are not frequently visited but should be! Notes: Always love learning about niche databases for genealogy research. Also had a brilliant idea to organize lists of databases on a spreadsheet, which I’m going to start doing ASAP. I have things bookmarked, but I do find it difficult to navigate. And it’ll be easier to start from a curated list of websites that I use regularly as opposed to digging through…

  • Webinars

    Webinar: Exploring Manufacturers (Non-Population) Schedules (ACPL)

    Title: “Exploring Manufacturers (Non-Population) Schedules” Presenter: Cynthia Theusch, librarian at Allen County Public Library Date viewed: December 29, 2020 (1h) Permalink: https://acpl.libnet.info/event/4723939 Summary: As early as 1810, the U.S. government gathered basic information and statistics from a variety of manufactures. Learn about investments of owners, wages of employees, products produced and more. See how you might add some of this information to your family story. Notes: I think I must’ve attended a presentation on this topic before, because it all seemed very familiar to me. It was interesting seeing the difference between a presentation from a library versus a professional (genealogist) presenter– the tone was more overtly informative, kind of…

  • Webinars

    Webinar: Tips for Interviewing Relatives (American Ancestors)

    Title: “Tips for Interviewing Relatives” Presenter: Stephanie Call, Associate Director of Archives and Education at Wyner Family Heritage Center at NEHGS Date viewed: December 17, 2020 (1h) Permalink: https://www.americanancestors.org/education/learning-resources/watch (or Youtube) Summary: The oral tradition of a family is perhaps just as important as the evidence you find in document-based research. Even if you learn that not all of the details are 100% accurate, these stories provide important clues to begin—or continue—your research, give life to names and dates on a page, and may provide information not found in records. But how do you start the conversation, stay on track, and record the information provided? This webinar will offer some…

  • Webinars

    Webinar: From the 18th to the 21st: The Records of Prohibition (BCG)

    Title: “From the 18th to the 21st: The Records of Prohibition” Presenter: Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL (LegalGenealogist.com) Date viewed: December 15, 2020 (1h15m) Permalink: https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=1286 Summary: The 18th amendment took effect in January 1920 and ushered in more than a decade of Prohibition until repealed by the 21st Amendment in December 1933. In those few years, so many records were created for juice joints and bootleggers, revenuers and Untouchables—producing a gold mine for researchers. Notes: I attended this webinar due to having at least one branch of the family in the bootlegging business. I don’t know much about them yet, but I thought it would be fun to…

  • Webinars

    Webinar: Same Name, Must be the Same Person (Georgia Genealogical Society)

    Title: “Same Name, Must be the Same Person” Presenter: Christine Crawford-Oppenheimer Date viewed: December 10, 2020 (1h15m) Permalink: Available only to members. ConferenceKeeper link for reference. Summary: An unprepared family historian can waste valuable research time tracking a supposed ancestor who isn’t actually in the person’s family; on the other hand, the family historian might not realize that an ancestor used more than one name. This talk discusses points related to personal identity to keep in mind when researching. Learn the kinds of unique identifiers that you can use to recognize ancestors, no matter what name they used, and differentiate them from other same-named people, so you will research your…